: feet don’t belong on the rocks :

Let’s start with the painfully obvious: this is the twenty-first century. Technology is so advanced and so astonishing, the average mind is blown on a regular basis. What with the stuff being done in space exploration, artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, computer technology — we’re constantly picking our chins up off the ground.

Take a look at satellites, for example. Those things are big, fat marvels. Not so terribly long ago, satellites were exotic, clandestine gizmos used primarily for military and espionage purposes. Now, they practically run our lives. They’re essential to weather forecasting; perfectly positioned for storm tracking and as climate change monitors.

They’re also crucial to TVs, GPS receivers, and smartphones, since satellites transmit signals to those devices virtually non-stop. And let’s not forget the images beamed back by the Hubble Space Telescope, wondrous, spectacular views of a dazzling universe. Human capabilities today are seemingly limitless.

So given the amazing technology on hand, why am I rolling my foot on a frozen water bottle? I mean it. At this stage in human development, you’d think medical research would’ve improved on the ice pack. They haven’t. Medical science can reattach limbs, transplant organs, and keep us breathing long past our expiration dates, but plain old ice is still the recommended treatment for inflammation and sprains and the like.

I hate ice. Applying it to skin is a cruel, inhumane, barbaric practice and should be abolished posthaste. The plantar fascia, too. Criminy, what a flimsy excuse for a ligament that is. The plantar fascia, you see, is a band of connective tissue running along the bottom of the foot, from heel to toes, and it’s supposed to act as a shock absorber.

I’d never even heard of it until, oh, 12 years ago. That’s when I heard a distinct pop and reckoned I’d been shot in the heel. But, no, my plantar fascia had ruptured, instead. I was hobbled for months, forced to lurch around on crutches. No one navigates well on those things; they’re a flipping health hazard.

This go-round isn’t a rupture, probably just a tear, but I limp and it hurts and I’m cheesed. Summer doesn’t last forever, you know. I want to be outside frolicking in the sunshine, carefree and jaunty. Summer doesn’t care. It sails along, unfettered by a wonky plantar fascia, and refuses to grant me a timeout. Is that fair? Can I call a foul?

copyright © 2017 the whirly girl

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24 Responses to “: feet don’t belong on the rocks :”

  1. Straddle the Turtle

    I know a couple other people who suffer from this. Seems it is not for sissies. One was told by her doctor to never ever ever go barefoot. That would put a real cramp in my style. Just realized I made a bad pun. Didn’t mean to, sorry. The other purchased a video with guided stretching exercise, which would lull you to sleep. Hope you heal soon 🙏🏻

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. dawnwairimu

    oh no, that’s horrible! :( I have had plantar fasciitis due to overtraining (I was training for my first marathon) and it took a long time to heal. I tried everything… heat, ice, stretching, chiropractor visits, massage, excercises for calves, etc… NOTHING helped until i switched from low-support to higher-support running shoes. it turns out my foot was over-pronating. once i switched shoes, the plantar slowly started to heal. it wasn’t overnight (it took months to totally heal). but i could tell the difference in how my foot felt. i am sending you positive thoughts of smooth and quick recovery!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • the whirly girl

      Isn’t the plantar fascia a horrible buzzkill? Oy. To compensate for the agony it caused I walked funny, which then threw my knee out. It’s been a painful, slow moving summer. Stoopid plantar fascia! But I think I’m through the worst, thank goodness.

      PS. What’s a good brand in shoes? I’ve been wearing Converse, but they’re worn out.

      Like

      Reply

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